Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Art Teacherin' 101: Episode 6

In last week's episode of Art Teacherin' 101, I shared with y'all what art supplies I order each year. I briefly mentioned glue bottles and my distaste for them (in fact, I do believe my words where "glue bottles were created by the devil meant to be stabbed to death by small children"). I commented that I long ago stopped using glue bottles which received a handful of questions as to how my students use glue instead. So, in this episode, I thought I'd share my solution with you!
For what we call glue cups, I use little resealable cups available at the grocery store. After a couple of weeks, the glue near the top begins to dry which can easily be pealed away and the container once again looks like new (not to mention, it's ultra satisfying pealing away that dried glue, I have kids ask to do it!). For brushes, we use those plastic bristle junk brushes that you can purchase by the millions. As for the container, I just happened to get lucky with these but really any plate, tray, whatever would work. Cover the glue at the end of the day, soak those brushes at night and never have to fiddle with those pesky bottles again! PRAISE BE.
Of course, that doesn't mean that this won't happen in your art room. But it will prevent these bad boys...
From becoming a weapon of mass glue bottle distraction. ETHEL, DON'T DO IT! RUN, ELMER, RUUUUUUN!
And hopefully this solution will mean that you and your students can return to using glue for the true reason it was intended...
Love to hear your solutions for getting out of that sticky mess that glue can be!

 photo signature_zpsd10b3273.png

19 comments:

  1. I agree whole heartily. I buy 2 ounce cups with lids, cut a square in the top refill as needed. A parent gives me tons of little brushes from where she works( an eye place) and we are good to go. This has saved my life. Retiring this year after 41 years. Whoo hoo😊 Love your blog

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the blog love :) I daresay this has saved my life as well (and maybe that of former glue bottle stabbers ;) ) We do what works, right?!

      Delete
  2. I think I will give this a shot if (when) I return to the Elementary zone. I have actually had decent luck with glue bottles by securing (around the top) a straightened paper-clip with a piece of string. I teach the kids that you use the straightened end to clear the clog. I demo this ad-nauseum and, even with my high school kiddos here in the metropolis of San Jose, Ca, recite "dot, dot, not a lot!" I find silliness still works with the 14-18 year-old set JUST FINE. :-) I am psyched to have found your site, and I am certain I will spend too much time on it this summer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you have a system that works, I say stick with it! Like, literally and figuratively ;) Don't go changing something that is a win in your art room, friend!

      Delete
  3. Thank you Cassie! From the bottom of all the dead (stabbed to death) glue bottles in my art room, thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anytime, friend! We've all been there. I'm all about finding what works best for our sanity and that of our students!

      Delete
  4. All glue bottles are collected at the end of class and the top is "closed" again with a damp rag. We hardly ever have a clog but I keep a container of water near the sink and a large clear container of clean glue caps for trading... if they get one that's clogged, we just trade it out. One of our favorite projects is drawing with the glue bottles, students learn to control the flow in 3rd grade, then we use chalk to add color when the glue dries...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sweet! I've always loved the glue line projects but never given it a go with my kids, might have to this year!

      Delete
  5. I use tap n glues...they are a red cap that only allows a dot of glue to come out...It was hilarious having to teach my older kids how to glue all over again...A little pricy these days for the caps but totally worth it in my book!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. where do you get these?

      Delete
    2. I believe art supply catalogs carry them. And probably Amazon.

      Delete
  6. I use tap n glues...they are a red cap that only allows a dot of glue to come out...It was hilarious having to teach my older kids how to glue all over again...A little pricy these days for the caps but totally worth it in my book!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I ever decide to turn to the Dark Side, I'll have to check those caps out ;) Thank you for sharing!

      Delete
  7. I'm gluten free... My neighbor asked if they had GF paste that I could eat these days as an art teacher... VERY funny :) I love glue sponges. The ones I have now have lasted me two years and they give just the right amount of glue on the paper. I also have 'slip bottles' that I put glue in... They work well for some projects too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't know you are gluten free! I've heard of GF paste before...and I've been asked about GF art supplies. I'm all, "well, if they are thinking about eating art supplies, then I'd be more concerned about THAT then them being allergic to gluten." ;)

      Delete
  8. My secret weapon are those blue plastic needles. They're the perfect size to poke a hole in the top of a stuck glue bottle. I have 3 awesome air tight plastic containers that are tall enough to stand up glue in, 8 bottles fit in each and I toss those blue plastic needles right in for student self service. Also, I rub the caps and threads with vaseline once a year to keep them easy opening and then glue picks off so easily! I also use glue sticks for certain projects but using a glue bottle properly is a great skill to teach so I force myself to do it. DOT DOT NOT A LOT!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it awesome when we find something that works?! High five, sistah!

      Delete
    2. Anonymous8/23/2018

      I have read that putting your glue lids in crock pot with a few drops of olive oil will stop clogs. Haven't tried it. I am trying the cup and brush because I can't take the "oozing mayonnaise" another day. I think they just like the feeling of squeezing it out.

      Delete
  9. I also uses brushes to spread glue. However, I refill Wilton squeeze bottles to distribute the glue onto recycled papers. I think they are normally used to pour out frosting or melted chocolate. They have wide tops that are easy to fill and large openings that I don't even cover anymore.

    I just discovered your posts. I am at the end of my art teaching career but you make me want to start all over again!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for your comments. I appreciate each and every one :)