Sunday, January 21, 2018

In the Art Room: Dean Russo-Inspired School Mascot!

I'm so excited to share this lesson with y'all! My students are loving it, we are learning about a wonderful artist, using new art supplies in unusual ways and making marvelous masterpieces all at the same time!

Our school mascot is the tiger. That was the inspiration behind which animal we created. However, you could do any animal or person for this project. In fact, if you check out the artist Dean Russo, our inspiration, you'll find that his main source of inspiration are animals. Here's the lesson I created for my students...and yours! 
Here are the supplies we used:
Bingo dotters! These are my NEW FAVORITE TOOL in the art room! If you follow me here, you've seen my first graders working with these too. I have had them in my cabinet forever (they come empty) and I initially filled them with tempera paint and water...big mistake. They clogged and didn't work at all. One day, I remembered them and decided to add India ink instead...bingo! (see what I did there?) They work great, are low mess and the kids LOVE them! Check out these HUGE drawings created by my third graders in just 30 minutes!
We did not draw these out first. We had a long chat about Beautiful Oops and just going with the flow...and not getting upset with what we perceive as our "mistakes". Then we just went for it. At the end of the lesson, so the kids could see everyone's work, we all stood on our chairs and took a look around the room. Then we let out a great big tiger's ROAR! 
This week we will be adding color with a fun method: chalk and liquid starch!
Let's first talk about chalk. My absolute favorite is Faber-Castell's chalk. It's bold, bright and works so well with this process.
Please watch the video so you can actually see the magic that is chalk and starch. I learned this trick from my sweet and AMAZING art teacher buddy Jennifer Alvarado. A lot of folks have told me that they have a hard time finding this product. Try Walmart online if you can't find it in the store. 

This will be the second time we've used this method this year. Check out my fourth grader's landscapes...so pretty!
This lesson is super for teaching color theory. These laminated color wheels get a lot of love during this lesson. 
Earlier this school year, I organized my oil pastels in bead containers after seeing a fellow art teacher do this. I will be interested to see just how well my third graders manage to keep these organized without Naggy Stephens having to get on their case. 
 I actually thought the tiger looked good before the pattern. But since that's what Russo is known for, I thought I'd give it a go. I'm so glad I did! I think the kids are going to have so much fun with this part.
As my students make progress on their tigers, I'll be sure and keep you posted. 
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19 comments:

  1. This is fabulous, did you make up the color wheels yourself?

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    1. I just googled "color wheel" and printed off the best ones I found!

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  2. Anonymous1/21/2018

    What kind of paper and what size did you use?

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    1. 18" squares for the kids and 12" square in my demo. I like 80 lbs paper.

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  3. Maybe this is a stupid questions, but can you use a paintbrush instead of your finger to spread out the starch?

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  4. I've ordered that liquid starch off amazon!

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  5. I just have to say... I LOVE that you have your chalk pastels organized into warm and cool color bins! I am at a new school this year, and it has been driving me absolutely insane that they are not that way anymore. Extra credit, anyone???

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  7. Hi Csssie, What is the ratio for the magical dobbers? They look like such fun. I thought I saw it somewhere by cant seem to find it anymore....It was water and Indian Ink....but any tips you have to create this concoction would be super..
    Thank you,
    Dana

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    1. Thank you so much for sharing the lessons!!!! I am also wondering about the bingo/ink dobbers. How much ink do you put in to make them? Are you worried about the students staining themselves or their cloths? You are amazing. I love all the lessons and the beautiful art!

      Thank you,
      Laura

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  8. Christian Rabon2/02/2018

    Hi Cassie,
    Love this! What do you do if on the second day, when it's time for chalk, you have students who were absent and haven't drawn their tiger yet. Was wondering if you reteach them while the others start, or what is your method? I sometimes go ahead and prerecord my drawing demo and that helps with the absent kids, but I don't always want to do that or have time to do that for every single lesson...

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  11. Anonymous5/14/2018

    Hi, great lesson! Could you use black felt tip instead of the India ink? Thanks

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  12. Cassie! Excited to try out this lesson. What was your ratio for the india ink? Did you water it down at all? Trying to order some and want to make sure I have enough. Thanks!

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  13. Hi Cassie- what age group did you do this with? I have an after-school group Id like to try it with but ages range from K-2?

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Thank you so much for your comments. I appreciate each and every one :)