Monday, February 13, 2017

In the Art Room: Chalk Prints and Shaving Cream Marbling

In second grade we are working like crazy with our short 30 minute art classes to try our hands at two different paper treatments: floating chalk prints and shaving cream marbling. My goal has been for all of my students to attempt both processes twice before the end of class. It's a go-go-go kind of class but it's a lot of fun. When I shared a couple short videos of my students working on these papers, I got a lot of questions about the process. So I created a video that will walk you through each. I'll also go through the supplies needed in this here post. Here's the how-to video:
Supplies for floating chalk prints:

* Paper. I used 6" X 9" papers. These will be used for the covers of their Rainbow Book. I only order between 80- 90 lbs paper for the art room. 
* Chalk. We used Freart Chalk by Prang. I like this chalk because it's high in pigment and thick like sidewalk chalk.
* Tongue depressors. We used the big ones which you can get cheap at the Dollar Tree.
* Tub of water. I made it so each my students had their own tub to save on time. I see my second graders at the end of the day so this meant I didn't have to hustle to move the tubs for my next class. 
If you watch the video, you'll see just how easy this process is...and how beautiful the results are. 
I have a feeling the kids are going to have a hard time deciding which beautiful papers to use for the covers of their Rainbow Book!
When doing these chalk prints, you can even use stencils to create a really cool look. Check out this blog post where we used star stencils
The best part is, you don't have to "set" these creations as you would normal chalk pieces!
 For shaving cream marbling, you'll need the following:

* Shaving cream. We used cheap dollar store stuff.
* Liquid watercolor.
* Paint brushes.
* Tongue depressors.
* Paper. 
This process required more steps so some of my students would get excited and forget those steps. I made sure to appoint my Art Teachers in Training who did a wonderful job reminding kids of the steps. Yay! 
I did not change out the bins of shaving cream or water. For the floating chalk prints, it was not necessary. For the shaving cream, it just meant that the following prints had more color. 
 Again, so pretty! I can't wait to see these on the covers of their books. Here are the books they are creating:
I have done shaving cream prints before...but never in a closed container. I am never going back, y'all! The mess is contained...like, literally.
Have y'all done these kind of prints before? I'd love to hear about it! I'm also curious to know what you did with your beautiful papers. 
I'll be sure and update you with our completed Rainbow Books!
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8 comments:

  1. Beautiful results and know the process is a hit! I LOVE the bin idea. Can you share where you found the bins...they are the perfect size! Plastic bins can be oddly pricey at times!

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  2. Thank you Cassie! I have loved watching ALL of your ideas! I just created the chalk prints myself to see how they work before doing them with my class and I had so much fun! I was wondering if it's necessary to change the water every time you create a new print? Or is the water good for several prints? I also wanted to use these for the covers of the rainbow books but noticed after touching the papers after they were dry that the chalk easily rubs off on my fingers which makes me wonder how effective these would be as book covers? Ideas or thoughts? Thanks for everything!

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  3. my middle school kids love pulling shaving cream prints. Last year we did Gyotaku prints over them, we have used them as sketchbook covers and paper to cut collage elements from...one year a kid pulled a dollar out of his pocket and marbled that!

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  4. my middle school kids love pulling shaving cream prints. Last year we did Gyotaku prints over them, we have used them as sketchbook covers and paper to cut collage elements from...one year a kid pulled a dollar out of his pocket and marbled that!

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  5. Not everyone can have creative mind but one can always use various tricks from these services. Thanks for sharing detailed informative blog with us

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  6. Definitely gonna try this with my after school club children! Thanks Cassie! :-)

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  7. I'm going to attempt the chalk printing on teaching practice with first class! eekk! Thanks very much for sharing :)

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  8. I wonder if I could do this on my crazy schedule... I see 720 K-5 kids 1-3 times a month for just 35 minutes. I'm impressed you did in 30 min.. any other pointers to get it done in my situation?

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Thank you so much for your comments. I appreciate each and every one :)